Auslan 2016

This year at Cranbourne Primary School we are learning Australian Sign Language (Auslan) as our Language Other Than English (LOTE). Auslan is used in the deaf community as the primary form of communication.

Term 2

We commenced our Auslan program in Term 2, with the students attending lessons in their houses every second Friday and reviewing and practising in their Learning Communities throughout the rest of the fortnight.  We are beginning the program with a focus on words and phrases that can be used to build conversation.

Watch the following Videos on Auslan.

Term 2 Week 2 - In this video we will be learning six Auslan Signs.

Lesson 1

In the first session the students were introduced to Auslan and discussed its purpose, as well as a few key things to remember:

  • For one handed signs you should always sign with your dominant (writing) hand
  • Your facial expression and body language helps get your meaning across more clearly ie. If you are asking a question your face needs to show that it is a question
  • Grammar and sentence structure in Auslan is very different from that of spoken English

The signs we learnt in the first session were:

Good morning, good afternoon, yes, no, boy and girl.

 

 

Term 2 Week 4 - In this video we will be learning six Auslan Signs.

Lesson 2

In this session the students reviewed what they had learnt in the previous lesson and added “how are you?”,  “good”, “bad”, “OK”,  “finished” and  “clapping” (giving a round of applause) to their collection of signs.




Term 2 Week 6 - In this video we will be learning six Auslan Signs.

Lesson 3

Once again the signs learnt in previous sessions were reviewed before the students learnt “please/thank you”, “you’re welcome”, “help you” and “help me”




Term 2 Week 8 - In this video we will be learning six Auslan Signs.

Lesson 4

In this session students learnt to as “How old are you?”. They also learnt the numbers 1-20. As part of this session students learnt that to differentiate between signing a number and signing an age the position of the hand being used to sign changes. To sign numbers generally (eg. for counting) they are signed, like most signs, just in front of the body. However to sign ages the numbers must be signed from the nose.



Finger Spelling - In this video we will learn all the letters of the Alphabet.



I can sing a rainbow - In this video we will learn how to sign the song 'I can sing a rainbow'




Family Signs - In this video we will learn how to sign family, father, mother,

brother, sister, who and baby.  

 


Family Signs - In this video we will learn how to sign grandfather, grandmother,

aunty, uncle, niece, nephew and cousin.